Elective Unit                                                                         (Min. No. 8)
1st semester Monday evening

CONTENT
This unit aims to explore the meaning and implications of the Christian belief that the cosmos is the creation of God which, although declared to be good, is experienced in brokenness. It comprises four elements: (1) theological and scientific views of the cosmos; (2) theological problems raised by the brokenness (‘fallenness’) of existence in the world; (3) theological views of the place and responsibility of humankind in the world; and (4) the tension between theological and scientific expectations/hopes about the eventual future of the cosmos.

NO PREREQUISITES

LEARNING OUTCOMES
Upon successful completion of this unit, it is expected that students will be able to:

  1. discuss the biblical views of the world as God’s good but broken creation
  2. identify the various stages of the modern encounter between theology and the sciences
  3. analyse and evaluate a range of views of the nature of God’s interaction with the world
  4. construct their own account of the doctrine of creation embracing its past, present and future aspects
  5. articulate some practical implications of belief in creation for Christian spirituality and ethics

ASSESSMENT
6000 word research essay

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Anderson, B., ed. Creation in the Old Testament. Minneapolis, MN: Fortress Press, 1984.

Astley, J. and A. Loades, eds. Creation: A Reader. London: T & T Clark, 2003.

Barbour, I. Religion in an Age of Science. London: SCM Press, 1990.

Davis, S.T. Encountering Evil: Live Options in Theodicy. Atlanta, GA: John Knox Press, 1981.

Edwards, D. Breath of Life: A Theology of the Creator Spirit. Maryknoll, NY: Orbis, 2004.

Gilkey. L. Maker of Heaven and Earth: The Christian Doctrine of Creation in the Light of Modern Knowledge. Lanham, MD: University Press of America, 1985.

Granberg-Michaelson, W. Ecology and Life: Accepting our Environmental Responsibility. Waco, TX: Word Books, 1988.

Hall, D.J. Imaging God: Dominion as Stewardship. Grand Rapids, MI: W.B. Eerdmans, 1986.

Klaiber, Walter. On Creation: Religion and Science in Dialogue. Translated Randi H. Lundell. Nashville,TN: Abingdon, 2011.

Mangum, J., ed. The New Faith-Science Debate: Probing Cosmology, Technology and Theology. Minneapolis, MN: Fortress Press, 1989.

Moltmann, J. God in Creation: An Ecological Doctrine of Creation. London: SCM Press, 1985.

Polkinghorne, J.C. The Work of Love: Creation as Kenosis. Grand Rapids, MI: W.B. Eerdmans, 2001.

Polkinghorne, J., and M. Welker, eds. The End of the World and the Ends of God: Science and Theology on Eschatology. Harrisburg, PA: Trinity Press International, 2000.

Southgate, C. et al. God, Humanity and the Cosmos: A Textbook in Science and Religion, Harrisburg, PA: T & T Clark, 1999.

Lecturer: CHRISTIAAN MOSTERT